Creative Writing

2016-17

Daily makeup page is located here.

 

Stageplay 2017

Download typing template here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jumble Story 2017

Checklist for due date Monday 2/20:

   • "Show, don't tell."
   • Include word count in heading.
   • Title your story.
   • DOUBLE-SPACE the body of the story.
   • If story is not finished, at end write "not finished" and include a preview of where you see it going.
   • Spellcheck and PROOFREAD!  Errors of carelessness cost more than errors of ignorance.
   • Attach purple sheet with your assigned elements.

WriMo Final Assignment: Query Letter • Synopsis • Sample Chapter

Getting Published: It's Just a Matching Quiz...

Editors to Query:
          Publishers accepting unagented submissions here.
          Database with oodles of possible publishers here: QueryTracker
          Pro Tip: research the publisher, editor, and/or agent for a favorite book that is LIKE the one you are writing. Try: Google Books, search for the book, then "agent" within the text, or "editor" within the text. (If this fails, you can always...look at the actual book.)

Once you've chosen a publisher/editor, find query letter info here.

Synopsis overview here.

Complete proposal template here.

 

Bowen-O-WriMo 2016

WriMo Day 4: "Write What You Know"

Write What You Know 1

Write What You Know 2

Don't Write What You Know (you do NOT need to sign up for the site to access the article -- click "X" to exit of the enrollment screens)

 

National Novel Writing Month

NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program (especially for teens, and you can set your own word count goal)

NaNoWriMo Global Challenge (more features, but goal is set at 50,000 words)

 

Ten Minute Play

When you are ready to start your own script, use the TYPING TEMPLATE HERE.

Required structure page from stageplay packet is here: (download for additional copies)

 

Ten Minute Play: Page by Page Structure

Ten Minute Play: Script Typing Tools

Play Script Typing Template    Using this template format, we estimate that one page of script equals approximately one minute of stage time.

If you use a different format, make sure that it is easy to follow; the scripts may be read electronically (on an overhead projector) by the theatre classes next year.

An example of another dialogue format that is easy to type and easy to follow is:

          GIRL: You may sit down, if you like.

          YOUNG MAN: (Eagerly) Are you sure?  I don’t want to interrupt your reading.

However, this format may result in a different proporation of pages-to-minutes; when in doubt, check your timing by reading the script aloud with appropriate pacing.

Ten Minute Play site (CAUTION: site not written specifically for school audiences; back out if you encounter anything inappropriate!

Extra credit: Template for DISCOVERING TEN MINUTE PLAYS is here. Click to download. Complete at least FOUR reviews (#1) and TWO comments on CONFLICT (#2). Print and turn in to teacher when done.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bowen-O-WriMo 2016

REQUIRED: Submit at least one poem to at least one contest. By end of period today, complete your entry and give MsB a copy of the poem/s with the name of contest/s to which it has been submitted.

OPTIONAL: If you are willing to share your poem on a class blog, please email the text to MsB at the "sd5" address.

 

Contest submissions: CAUTION to all writers! Notice what (if anything) happens to your copyright by entering and/or winning any contest.

matching MATCHING m a t c h i n g matching matching MATCHING m a t c h i n g matching
MATCH your work to the requirements of the contest!

By end of period on Friday, complete your revision/submission and give MsB a copy of the work/s with the name of contest/s to which it has been submitted.

 

Contests:

FHS Writing Center List of Contests

FHS Writing Center List of Contest Deadlines

 

Contests:

Poets and Writers Contests: Searchable Database

Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth Competitions

Scholastic.com Contests

Teen Ink submission guidelines (you must register for the site to submit; read carefully the "rights" statement!)

Avoiding scam contests...with a list of good ones to try!

When competition gets really intense...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WriMo Final Assignment instructions: click here.

Query letter info here.

Getting Published:
          Publishers accepting unagented submissions here.
          Database with oodles of possible publishers here: QueryTracker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FXT Script Template here.

Story Writing

Story Assignment Strategy #3: Anchored in Time and Place

 

Per. 1: Click here to post your text and review fellow authors' work.

Per. 3: Click here to post your text and review fellow authors' work.

Free help

Resource: Clever ways to integrate setting from Writing World

Resource: A full catalog of setting features from Writer's Digest

Resource: Special help for authors of fantasy and scifi

Resource: Author 'Asta Bowen...she's around here somewhere...

 

Story Assignment Strategy #2: The Major Dramatic Question (also known as Central Conflict)

A major dramatic question must be answered with either a yes or a no, and it’s a general question that applies to a story.  For example, the MDQ for Romeo and Juliet might be, “Will they get married?”  For Harry Potter, it could be, “Will Harry defeat Voldemort?”  For The Hunger Games it might be “Will Catniss survive?” (blog source)

Per. 1: Click here to post your text and review fellow authors' work.

Per. 3: Click here to post your text and review fellow authors' work.

Free help

Resource:The Dramatic Question

Resource: Creating Conflict

Resource: Where's Your Conflict?

Resource: Author 'Asta Bowen...she's around here somewhere...

 

Story Assignment Strategy #1: Characters We Care About

Per. 1: Click here to post your text and review fellow authors' work.

Per. 3: Click here to post your text and review fellow authors' work.

Free help

Resource: Harvey Chapman's Novel Writing Help

Resource: Men With Pens

Resource: Advice from literary agent Donald Maass

Resource: Author 'Asta Bowen...she's around here somewhere...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FXT Script Template here.

National Novel Writing Month: click here.

Creativity Research Notes: click here for template.

Poetry Slam Handout: click here.

Teen Ink slam poetry examples: click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Project Handout

 

 

Stageplay Typing Template: download here.

Story Final Assignments (due Friday 4/25): see details on p. 20 of Story packet.

REVISED: DUE TODAY Please SHARE (with editing option) your gDoc with teacher at email below.

You may bring your 1000 word sample (typed, double-spaced) at start of class Monday 4/28.

If you haven't used Google docs, now is a great time to try out this service. (You need a Google account for this.)

1) Share your complete manuscript electronically with   b o w e n o w r i m o [ a t ] g m a i l . c o m
2) Polish and print your BEST 1000 words of manuscript. This will become your "sample chapter" for contest/publication submission.
3) Query letter: we'll look at this after 1 and 2 are complete.

NOTE: Tomorrow we will look at dialogue. See pp. 11-12-13 in Story packet. Be sure you HAVE some dialogue to work with by tomorrow!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crail-Carr (format as shown and submit through Mrs. Stoner)

Authors of the Flathead (format as shown and submit through Mrs. Stoner; see details at Authors page)

Creative Communication (format as shown and submit through Mrs. Stoner, OR via web page)

American Library of Poetry (format as shown and submit through Mrs. Stoner, OR online here)

Teen Ink

Poets and Writers Contest Search Page

The Gigantic List of More Writing Contests Than You Ever Imagined Page (although gigantic, list is not necessarily up to date)

April Deadlines (Madpoetry.org) Most of these, however, require a submission fee to enter.

Graysparrow Press (See restrictions under #4 on the linked page)

 

matching MATCHING m a t c h i n g matching matching MATCHING m a t c h i n g matching

 

Publishing

          Advice to Young Poets: READ THIS FIRST!!

          Poetry Publishers Who Accept Electronic Submissions

          More Advice and Poetry Publishers

 

 

Jumble Story final instructions:

1. Manuscript is typed, DOUBLE-spaced, with complete heading (Name, Period, Date, Jumble Story, WORD COUNT.)

2. You have PROOFREAD and edited to the best of your ability. There are NO avoidable errors.

3. Author's statement at end or on back (handwritten or typed):
     a. What did you do to help us "care" about your character?
     b. How do you feel about this story? Like/dislike about it?
     c. What kind of feedback would you like from fellow writers?

 

 

 

JUMBLE STORY: Creating a Character We Can "CARE" About

--A character we can identify with AND/OR

--Funny or attractive or strong AND/OR

--Noble or well-intentioned AND/OR

--Endearingly flawed

etc!

A great way to do this is through BACKSTORY: use a few sentences or a paragraph to SHOW a significant bit of the character's past, one that reveals and reinforces the trait/s above.

 

A note on dialogue:

Do have dialogue! It really spices up a story.

Punctuate and format your dialogue correctly.

Rules for Writing Dialogue from Mr. Clements.com


1. Create a new paragraph every time the speaker changes:
      “Hello, Shirley,” said Bob.
      “Good afternoon, Bob,” replied Shirley.


2. All dialogue goes inside quotation marks:
      “These pretzels are making me thirsty!” exclaimed Kramer.


3. All punctuation goes inside the quotation marks:
      “Wow! These pretzels are making me thirsty!” exclaimed Kramer.
Notice that the exclamation mark is before the closing quotation mark.
      “What kind of pretzels are they?” asked Elaine.
Notice that the question mark is before the closing quotation mark.
      “They’re called Salty Dogs,” replied Kramer.
Notice that the comma is before the closing quotation mark.


4. When a speaker’s quote ends in a period (e.g., a basic declarative or imperative sentence: see Types of Sentences for more information) there are two rules:

1. If you put the speaker’s name before the quote, put a comma before the opening quotation mark and put a period before the closing quotation mark:
      Kramer said, “That’s just the way it goes. Sometimes you win and sometimes you lose.”
      Notice the comma before the opening quotation mark and the period before the closing quotation mark.

2. If you put a speaker’s name after the quote, put a comma before the closing quotation mark, then cite the speaker, and put a period at the end of the sentence:
      “That’s just the way it goes. Sometimes you win and sometimes you lose,” said Kramer.
      Notice the comma before the closing quotation mark and the period at the end of the sentence.


5. If you insert the speaker’s name in the middle of a quote, insert it at the end of the speaker’s first sentence and punctuate appropriately:
      “That’s just the way it goes,” said Kramer. “Sometimes you win and sometimes you lose.”


6. When a speaker speaks more than one paragraph, do not put end quotation marks at the end of the first paragraph, only put them at the end of the very last paragraph, and put open quotation marks at the beginning of every paragraph:
      “This is a sticky situation,” said Kyle. “It’s similar to that time we went on a school trip with Mrs. Crabtree.
      “Mrs. Crabtree was the worst kind of teacher,” continued Kyle. “She made us pay attention in class, and when we didn’t, she’d hang us from the ceiling by our thumbs. She was awful!”
      Notice how the first paragraph doesn’t have an end quotation mark. This indicates to the reader that the next paragraph is attributed to the same speaker.


7. If a character is thinking something or saying something to his or herself just use italics to indicate that the speech is internal:
      Kyle inched his way to the front of the bus. This is a sticky situation, he thought.


8. When a speaker quotes another speaker, use a single opening and closing quotation mark to indicate the quote. This is done using the apostrophe key:
      “I could have sworn he said, ‘Vengeance will be mine!’ not ‘Business is doing fine’,” said Martin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Creative Essay

Creative Essay Survey Worksheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2012-13

Daily makeup is located at this page.

Book Resources: Hard copy

Scrapbook style option
Handmade book
Example instructions at:
http://www.thelateafternoon.com/make-your-own-handmade-book
http://www.instructables.com/id/Making-your-own-book/

Book Resources: Online  *Use at your own risk!  Sites below are examples only and have not been evaluated/approved for student use.  Get parental approval of all copyright, privacy, and financial matters before proceeding!

example sites:
lulu.com
blurb.com
bookemon.com
scribblitt.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FXT Script Typing Template    Using this template format, you can estimate that one page of script equals approximately one minute of stage time.

If you use a different format, make sure that it is easy to follow; the scripts have to be read electronically (on an overhead projector) by the theatre classes next year.

An example of a different dialogue format that is easy to type and easy to follow is:

          GIRL: You may sit down, if you like.

          YOUNG MAN: (Eagerly) Are you sure?  I don’t want to interrupt your reading.

 

 

Haiku Contest Submission

2011-12

Creative Nonfiction

Teen Ink -- Reading Creative Nonfiction Assignment

Open the document linked above. Follow the links to read articles of your choice on the Teen Ink site.

Be sure to STAY in the NONFICTION section for all of this assignment!

Below is a screenshot of the subcategories you will see when you hover your mouse over the Nonfiction tab.

 

 

 

 

 

Period 1: Amazing Creativity Finds on the web...Period 1: record your websites HERE!

Period 6: Amazing Creativity Finds on the web...Period 6: record your websites HERE!

 

 

FXT: Flathead eXperimental Theatre

FXT: Script Typing Tools

Script Template   (Download .doc)

 

 

FXT: A few sources of inspiration
Daily Interlake Law Roundup
Archetypes (Author Tami Cowden's page)
Online Story Generators

FXT: Ten Minute Play site (CAUTION: site not written specifically for school audiences; back out if you encounter anything inappropriate!)

FXT: Other Script Tools

Online Scriptwriting Software (use at own risk!)
          Zhura
          ScriptBuddy
          Scripped

Google Docs is also a convenient choice, though it does not have dedicated scriptwriting features.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poetry Project

 

2009-10

Bowen-O-wrimo!

Poetry Submissions

Verse Forms

Poem In Your Pocket Day (April 29)

New Poem(s) to Love (download .doc)

Portfolio -- Semester Exam

Creative Essay

FHS Writing Center -- Contest Links

Poetry Workshop

2008-09

Inspiring Quotes for Writing

Plotshot

File Drop

FXT Giveaway Vertical Format

FXT Giveaway Horizontal Format

Poetry Chapbook

 

 

 

Grad Speech

Poetry Links

 

Pantoum Form

Mediadrome

Memorization & Presentation

Poetry Out Loud

"Committed to Memory"

Tips for Memorizing Poems

How to Memorize a Poem